backcountry skiing with the foothill freak

The Freaks'
Mostly Accurate
Ski Glossary

Ways to Ride/Ways to Tour

Arlberg Technique
noun. The first technique of turning on skis without the use of a rudder, trees or falling. Developed in Arlberg, Austria.
Bust
Adjective. To do whole heartedly.
Boost
Verb. To go airborn with a mostly vertical path of trajectory.
Bonk
Verb. To strike a non H2O surface (such as a rock, tree or stump) with your board, boards, or inner tube, either strategically, or accidentally.
Cracker Walk
Verb. Trying to walk on you skis when your heels are locked down. Telemarkers turned Alpiners are painfully aware of doing the cracker walk
Dawn Patrol
Verb, noun. To extricate oneself from bed at ungodly hours of the morning in an attempt to bring some life to a mind numbing corporate existence. See also Weekend Warrior.
Dipsy Doodle
Noun. The first skiing technique developed to ski short radius turns in deep powder. Origin: Alta, 1948ish. To travel a zig zagging course, like a screw ball in baseball. Note: those who ski deep hounds powder may be familiar with the term screw ball.
Dusk Patrol
Noun. Slacker version of the Dawn Patrol. Also good for full moon evenings and first dates.
Farming
Verb. Powder conservation technique. Turns are kept close together in order to allow for more, hyper controlled powder skiing. Approach used by guides to corral obedient powder thirsty clients. Farming may also be used as a landscape art form, in which the farming artist creates a wavy, van goghesque pattern on slopes for all to admire... Or laugh at. See Also Spooning.
Huck
Verb. To jump off a preferably large precipice with more concern for the air time than on the inevitable landing and/or impact.
Huck your meat
Verb. A super sized huck with blatant loss of concern over bodily injury.
In the back seat
Adjective. To ski with your butt hanging over the tails of your skis.
jib
Verb. To ride with an emphasis on waiting in line to hit select terrain features.
One n' Done
Noun. A ski tour that involves one ascent and one descent. Converse of yo-yo-ing.
Paramark
Verb. to ski free heel equipment with no intention of ever dropping the knee. Also known as telellel.
Pat the Dog
Verb. To ride a snowboard in fear of removing your hands from the ground. See also Knuckle Dragger.
Poach
Verb. To cut in front of another, riding their line before they can get to it.
Post Hole
verb. to sink up to your knee or deeper in snow. Usually happens when booting up a powdery snowpack, but under extreme snow conditions, can occur with skis on as well.
Snake
verb. Like poaching, but with more strategic buildup. For example, getting others to focus on the natural beauty of the mountains while you quietly take off your skins.
Spooning
Verb. Making turns in powder directly next to another set of turns.
Stick
Verb. To ski a line or land a jump without falling. See also stomp.
stomp
Verb. snowboarder version of stick.
Straight Line (figure 11s)
The ultimate method of skiing that not only reduces the distance between point A and point B, but conserves powder and deters the development of moguls.
Telellel
Verb. When telemark skiers pretend to be on Alpine equipment. See also Paramark.
Eighting, Figure Eighting
Making turns in powder that overlap and mirror an existing set of tracks. A type of farming that optically resembles a stacked column of number 8s.
Yo-Yo-ing
To make multiple laps in the same slope. Phenomonon that often leads to farming.

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